Twelve Million Dollars Worth of Media Manipulation

camera_zoomMoney talks and maybe now that a guns rights organization is suing well-known media personality Katie Couric, and other producers, for alleged deceptive editing in a “documentary” movie, other secular media outlets just might wake up and realize that they can’t continually play fast and loose with the facts in order to push opinion and agenda, and get away with it.

On Tuesday, September 13th, the Virginia Citizens Defense League (VCDL), a gun rights advocacy group, filed a twelve-million-dollar lawsuit against Couric along with the director of “Under the Gun,” Stephanie Soechtig, for making members of the group appear stumped by Couric’s questions when they were actually responding in great detail.

The major point of contention centers on a nine second clip in the film; nine seconds of silence which follows Couric asking “if there are no background checks how do you prevent felons or terrorists from purchasing a gun?” The lawsuit details how the producers actually manufactured the fictional exchange by splicing in footage the filmmakers took after telling the guests to be silent while the crew was calibrating their equipment.

The director claims they were merely allowing time for the audience to ponder the question. Sure, and I am the new queen of England. Thank goodness an audio version of the interview was actually captured in its entirety through another recording. Unfortunately, as a former secular news insider, I can say this situation happens more than the average media consumer realizes. Even if this major lawsuit doesn’t cause the liberal media to think twice about inventing rather than actually reporting the news, at least it shines a spotlight for a short period of time on an industry that has lost its soul for the sake of agenda, sensationalism, and profit. No wonder yet another survey has found that trust in the mass media has dropped to its lowest level in Gallop polling history with only 32% of Americans now saying they have a great deal or a fair amount of trust in the media. Go figure.

Photo: Juno Namkoong Lee, Flickr

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